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Summarizing, Paraphrasing, and Quoting  

Last Updated: Oct 24, 2012 URL: http://north.niles-hs.libguides.com/summarizing Print Guide RSS Updates

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What are the Differences?

These three ways of incorporating other writers' work into your own writing differ according to the closeness of your writing to the source writing.

Quotations must be identical to the original. They must start with quotes and end with quotes. They must also have a citation that gives credit to the author at the end.

Paraphrasing involves putting a passage from source material into your own words. A paraphrase must have a citation that gives credit to the author. Paraphrased material is usually shorter than the original passage.

Summarizing involves putting the main idea(s) into your own words, including only the main point(s). Once again, it is necessary to a citation that gives credit to the author. Summaries are significantly shorter than the original.

Information is taken from:  Driscoll, Dana L., and Allen Brizee. "Quoting, Paraphrasing, and Summarizing." The Owl at Purdue. Purdue University, 2 Nov. 2010. Web. 21 Mar. 2011.

      

    Why use quotations, paraphrases, and summaries?

    Quotations, paraphrases, and summaries serve many purposes. You might use them to . . .

    • Provide support for claims or add credibility to your writing
    • Refer to work that leads up to the work you are now doing
    • Give examples of several points of view on a subject
    • Call attention to a position that you wish to agree or disagree with
    • Highlight a particularly striking phrase, sentence, or passage by quoting the original
    • Distance yourself from the original by quoting it in order to cue readers that the words are not your own
    • Expand the breadth or depth of your writing

    Key Suggestions:

    • Read the entire text, noting the key points and main ideas.
    • Summarize in your own words what the single main idea of the essay is.
    • Paraphrase important supporting points that come up in the essay.
    • Consider any words, phrases, or brief passages that you believe should be quoted directly.

    Information is taken from:  Driscoll, Dana L., and Allen Brizee. "Quoting, Paraphrasing, and Summarizing." The Owl at Purdue. Purdue University, 2 Nov. 2010. Web. 21 Mar. 2011.

        

      Plagiarism

      According to the Merriam-Webster Online Dictionary, to "plagiarize" means

      • to steal and pass off (the ideas or words of another) as one's own
      • to use (another's production) without crediting the source
      • to commit literary theft
      • to present as new and original an idea or product derived from an existing source.

          
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